Why is Garden Furniture Cheaper than Indoor Furniture?

Depending on the extensiveness to which you might have researched or gotten exposure to the differences in costs between indoor and outdoor furniture, you might very well hold an opposite view to that which is suggested here. As the title suggests, the general view suggested here is that garden furniture is indeed cheaper than indoor furniture, but why is that?

Settling the score

Before we start getting into the exact reasons why outdoor furniture is generally cheaper than indoor furniture, it’s perhaps pertinent to settle the score and put to bed the argument of whether the outdoor furniture is indeed cheaper than that which you’d find in your interior domestic spaces.

It’s simple; just think about the most expensive interior furniture you can find, anywhere and compare it with the most expensive outdoor furniture. The same should be considered of the cheapest of each furniture type.

Supply and demand

It’s usually somewhat of an afterthought, that of furnishing one’s outdoor spaces. People have a natural inclination to want to make provision for the interior first, before finally thinking about furnishing their gardens to perhaps enjoy some relaxing time in, once in a while. As a result, there’s simply more demand for indoor furniture.

Also, nobody lives in their garden exclusively while there are indeed many homes and other domestic spaces which don’t even have an outdoor space. Thinking of the city dwellers who migrate to the most urban of areas for work and perhaps easier living, how many of those units even have space for some teak outdoor patio furniture?

Anything that has more demand will always be more expensive than what can be considered to be its after-thought counterpart.

Design, styling and finishing

People tend to pay more attention to their interior spaces in many more ways than the outdoors, so naturally, there would be more design styling and finishing applied to indoor furniture pieces than outdoor pieces. If you compare a deck lounger to a living room couch, for instance, perhaps the same teak wood could be used in the bases of both of these pieces, but in the case of the living room couch, there would be a lot more styling and finishing applied.

This is not to say an outdoor piece doesn’t look as classy, polished or “finished” as interior one, but there’s just more that goes into interior furniture that ultimately makes it more expensive than outdoor furniture.

There’s also an element of planned obsolescence built into indoor furniture, but that’s perhaps a topic for another day.

Garden furniture works out cheaper in the long-run

In the long-run, garden furniture does indeed work out cheaper than indoor furniture, mostly because if you choose the right supplier and the right wood, outdoor furniture can last a lifetime. It would need the proper care and maintenance as well, which in the case of teak wood is pleasantly minimal.

In the long run, the more functional garden furniture works out cheaper than the indoor furniture, which in many respects is made more with aesthetics in mind than the functionality you’d find in outdoor pieces.